PCH106: REACTION ENGINEERING & REACTOR ANALYSIS

 

L

T

P

Cr

 

3

1

0

3.5

 

Course Objective: To learn about reaction kinetics for single, multiple, isothermal, non-isothermal reactions and reactor design procedures.

 

Chemical Kinetics: Reaction rates, Kinetics of homogeneous reactions, Interpretation of reaction data.

 

Isothermal Reactor Design: Design equations for batch, Plug flow, Back-mix flow and Semi-batch reactors.

 

Multiple Reactions: Maximizing desired product in parallel reactions and series reactions, Solutions to complex reactions.

 

Steady State Non-Isothermal Reactor Design: Combining material and energy balances for non-isothermal CSTR and Plug flow reactors (adiabatic and with heat exchange), Adiabatic temperature and equilibrium conversion, Optimum feed temperature, Multiple steady states, Non-isothermal multiple reactions.

 

Solid Catalysed Reactions:  Steps in catalytic reactions: adsorption isotherms, surface reaction, desorption rate, limiting step, Diffusion and reaction in spherical catalyst pellets, Estimation of diffusion and reaction limited regimes, Mass transfer and reaction in a packed bed, Fluidized bed and multiphase reactors.

 

Non-ideal Reactors: Measurement of RTD, Characteristics of RTD, RTD in ideal reactors, Reactor modelling using RTD.

 

Course Learning Outcomes (CLO):

1.      Ability to analyze chemical reactors and reaction systems

2.      Designing experiments involving chemical reactors, and analyzing and interpreting data

3.      Ability to solve problems of mass transfer with reaction in solid catalyzed reactions

4.      Design and sizing of industrial scale reactor on the basis of kinetic data obtained at lab scale

Recommended Books:

1.    Fogler, H.S., Elements of Chemical Reaction Engineering, Prentice-Hall India (2003).

2.    Levenspiel, O., Chemical Reaction Engineering, John Wiley (1991).

3.    Froment, G.F., and Bischoff, K.G., Chemical Reactor Analysis and Design, John Wiley (2001).

4.    Smith, J.M., Chemical Engineering Kinetics, McGraw-Hill (1981).